Do I Watch Too Much Porn? That Depends On A Few Factors

Being addicted to porn is more common than ever, considering the internet’s endless supply. Compulsive habits surrounding porn usage are often developed as an escape, anxiety relief, or to scratch an itch that someone’s brain chemistry might be prone to planting. However, you don’t need an addictive personality to develop a life-disrupting obsession.

How much is too much?

As with any addiction, one must take an honest look at how the porn obsession is affecting their life as a whole. If someone is watching it at work, trying to cut back without success, or allowing the habit to affect real-life relationships and encounters, it could be time to seek help.

Similarities to substance abuse

Someone struggling with a porn addiction should be aware of how the brain’s pleasure-seeking pathways may be altered by the habit. Porn can act like a “super stimulant” and cause cravings for new content every day. Dopamine’s pleasure-seeking cycle is central to the tendency for porn users to become obsessed with finding “the perfect clip.” The need for increasingly shocking or stimulating material can become a problematic, never-ending quest, because (unlike a Playboy magazine or DVD), the internet offers an endless supply. Social media addiction features a similar cycle of searching and scrolling.

A safe space to analyze a potential porn-watching problem

A sex therapist or couples therapist like Kim Ronk has heard it all and won’t judge, offering a safe space to explore how someone’s porn addiction came to be, and how to manage it going forward. She can help an individual explore their habit, as well as facilitate a healthy approach to discussing porn as a couple. Not all porn-watching is a problem. Therapy can help an individual work through unnecessary shame, or a couple work through shyness in order to develop a healthy approach.

How do I get my boyfriend to stop watching porn?

If your partner is watching porn at improper times, or to a degree that it’s affecting your relationship, it’s time to seek therapy, as mentioned above. If one partner is more comfortable with porn than the other, but the usage isn’t affecting other areas of life, it could be a matter of honesty and communication, which a therapy session could facilitate. Unrealistic expectations established by porn is also something to explore.